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20121222
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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
south asia correspondent julie mccarthy, who's reporting this story from delhi. jns julie, there are tens of thousands of rapes in end yabs, there are 40,000 rape cases currently-- currently in the courts. why has this case caught the national imagination? >> wbltion i think what cause the imagination of the people was this horrendous attack on this young woman that is 23-year-old girl who was-- who is at the heart of this upheaval in india. after the shock subsided there was anger and it poured out into the streets. so you had a very graphic symbol around which people rallied. and the protests in many ways were spontaneous. they were driven by the it revolution that is india. social media played a huge role in assembling people, getting out the message, what were they doing, where were they doing it. and prot testers were demanding sus 'tis for this young woman who they said was gang raped on a moving bus that passed through police check pointses that assault was taking place. so there was dismay of the police who had long been criticized on their infectioniveness on hand
south asia correspondent julie mccarthy, who's reporting this story from delhi. jns julie there are tens of thousands of rapes in end yabs, there are 40,000 rape cases currently-- currently in the courts. why has this case caught the national imagination? >> wbltion i think what cause the imagination of the people was this horrendous attack on this young woman that is 23-year-old girl who was-- who is at the heart of this upheaval in india. after the shock subsided there was anger and it poured out into the streets. so you had a very graphic symbol around which people rallied. and the protests in many ways were spontaneous. they were driven by the it revolution that is india. social media played a huge role in assembling people, getting out the message, what were they doing, where were they doing it. and prot testers were demanding sus 'tis for this young woman who they said was gang raped on a moving bus that passed through police check pointses that assault was taking place. so there was dismay of the police who had long been criticized on their infectioniveness on handling violent cri
feet off the ground. atlantis's last flight was in july of 2011. it was also the last of nasa's historic shuttle program, end of an era. the next time the public sees the spacecraft, it will be housed in a special museum at kennedy space center in florida. a grand opening is set for this summer, and who else would be there but our own john zarrella to bring us up to date on the project. whoa, do you look good. now, let me get this straight, john. this is a 180-foot-tall shuttle. it weighs more than 152,000 pounds. and it's shrink wrapped in plastic right now? >> reporter: yeah, it is. and you know, for the viewers out there, if you don't recognize what's there behind me, that's atlantis. in 16,000 feet of shrink wrap in order to protect it. you know, i've got the hard hat on. we're right here inside. there's guys working, building the museum around the shuttle atlantis as we speak, working nearly 24/7 to get ready for that grand opening. and you see the angle, alina, of how it is displayed here, supported on giant supports. that's a 43 1/2-degree angle. it is the angle that th
the grand opening in july and not only the shuttle which is the centerpiece of all of this but there will be a telescope replica suspended here in this exhibit area. there will be about 60 int active games and such for people to see and use and play with and get an idea of what it's like again, it last flew in july 2011. that was the final shuttle flight of the shuttle program in history and atlantis, of course, the last of the shuttle fleet to fly. candy? >> john, thanks so much. it looks like fun. i will be there next summer. >> sure. >>> you're in "the situation room." happening now, the uniquely washington version of let's make a deal. we have the latest from the this afternoon's big meeting in the oval office. who's eavesdropping on your e-mail? the government may be. what congress is doing that may have civil libertarians up in arms. >>> and a plea for help describing work conditions and it may be a hoax and dirty international politics. welcome to our viewers around the united states and around the world. wolf blitzer is off today. i'm candy crowley and you'r
that it did. i was not on that trip, so i do not know specifically. i also visited libya in july. i also visited in september after the attack in benghazi. i can speak to my own experience. secretary clinton has said, all those of us as senior leaders are responsible for what is happening. i certainly hold myself accountable. i certainly had a lot of time to think about sharper questions i could have cost, sharper focus i could have provided. >> on your visit in july,, or september, the debt issue and specific come up? the folks on the ground say, we're worried about what has happened was security? >> no, there's no specific discussion about it. i did talk to ambassador stevens in general terms. in march of 2012? >> i am certain it did. we certainly emphasize the importance of not only improve in the security capabilities of the libyan interim government at that time. we offered a number of programs to help them build those institutions which are made one of the greatest weaknesses of the libyan it from government. -- interim government. >> your pretty sure that the issue came up, you ju
. [video clip] >> we took that vote back on july 25. it did not originate in the house. it has no chance of becoming law. that is what i said back on july 25. we allow that vote and i said we knew it did not pass constitutional muster and that democrats would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house as the constitution requires if they were serious and as i called on them to do last week. the so-called senate bill is no more than a glorified sense of the senate revolution. let's put that talking point aside. host: mitch mcconnell -- or is a story from politico.com, "why they will not go over the cliff." "they see an advantage in negotiating with republicans that will feel free not to raise taxes once the rates have gone out. the president is pulling in the mid 50's. there is still time for the dynamic to shift. speed banner will stress the house has passed legislation to avert the entire fiscal cliff. there is an ad we want to point out in "the new york times" and "the washington post." together" rds "come as a way to send a message to congress. "the struggle of today is fo
was to pass every appropriations bill by the fourth of july break. my staff said i am crazy. it was feasible if you went about the work seriously. by the fourth of the library, guess what? all of the bills had been passed. we were able to send everyone of those bills to the president's desk. they were signed in the law with bipartisan support. that sort of work can make a difference. more voices need to be heard in support of that effort. >> my recollection would be since then, it has been budgeting by continuing resolutions. >> we have done an awful lot. a lot of people do not realize we have demonstrated we can do this regular order. the more we move the committee back rather than having everything dominated in a speaker's office, the better off the congress will be. >> who loses and who gains when -- >> the existing agencies have their pipelines already clogged with money and we throw more money at it without any serious oversight. continuing resolutions are ignoring our responsibility and our goal is that we have got a job to do. it is time we get back to the responsibility. >> the nickn
that vote back on july 25th, the democratic bill is, quote, a revenue measure that didn't originate in the house so it's got no chance whatsoever of becoming law, end quote. that's what i said back on july 25th. the only reason we ever allowed that vote on that proposal is i said at that time was that we knew it didn't pass constitutional muster. and the democrats were really serious, they would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house as the constitution requires and as i called on them to do again last week. to repeat, the so-called nate bill is nothing more than a glorified sense of the senate resolution. so let's put that convenient talking point aside from here on out. last night i told the president we'd be happy to look at whatever he proposes but the truth is we're coming up against a hard deadline here and, as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. and republicans aren't about to write a blank check or anything senate democrats put forward just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that wouldn't be fair to the american peop
the in"under god" were added to the pledge of allegiance, it he proclaimed the fourth of july and national day of prayer. on that day, eisenhower fished in the morning, both in the afternoon, and played bridge in the evening. there were prayers -- perhaps when the chief executive faced a daunting putt. this was not his first foray into the darkened ground of the relationship between religion and american politics. three days before christmas in 1952, president elect ike made a speech in which she said "our form of government has no sense unless it is founded in the deeply felt religious faith and i do not care what it is." he received a much ridicule from his cultured despise years. his professed indifference to the major of the religious faith. it is the first part of the statement that deserves continuing attention. certainly many americans, perhaps the majority of them, agreed that democracy or at least our democracy, which is based on a belief in natural rights, presupposes religious faith. people believe this that all people are endowed by their creator with certain unali
, on the floor we call it the growth dividend. if you look at a chart for our ten-year starting on july 26th, and i pick july 26th because that was mario draghi's big day. he said anything it takes. as you look at our rates over that period, then look at the boon rates over that period. you can see that the growth/disparity, our yields are higher in that formation than boon yields, because even though funding issues have been largely contained since that july 26th day, we can still see that the prospects for growth may be reflected in these charts, as the prospects for growth are larger in the u.s., fiscal cliffs issues would make it larger. foreign exchange, mainly everybody on this post-holiday, light volume session, seems to have one eye on the yen. whether it's against the u.s. currency, the dollar/yen or euro/yen. both patterns look more aggressive on the dollar side. obviously abe as prime minister is going to bring along with him the largest printing press we can remember recently. and that, of course, will start a chain reaction and maybe other printing presses will run a little fast
. >> julie seger on c-span on verizon. c-span has been brought to you by your television provider as a public service. >> next, it is a global look at the economy with a speech by greek economist. among his many books, the economics professor recently minotaur" andobal natar we will show you as much as we can before the house gavels in at 2:00 p.m. eastern. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, france, -- friends, this is a singular honor to be a guest in this temple of civic life. thanks to all the good people for making this possible, to my publisher, the staff that are manning the barricades outside. my novel is debt crisis and the future of the world economy. i will be arguing that there is no such thing as a debt crisis. there is no debt crisis in the united states of america and europe, and there is no such thing as the debt crisis in my own country, which is nevertheless being consumed by debt. you know the joke about balloonist. the balloon has been blown off isrse, and at some point they no such thing as a debt crisis. manage to gain control of the balloon and lower it above a farm. th
well. >> there you go. >> let's hope on the 18th of july, in the year 2013, you and i are sitting here celebrating nelson mandela's 95th birthday. >> can you imagine? i think we will. >> let's hope. >> fingers crossed. thank you, nadia. really appreciate that. >>> it is still -- it is still -- it will still be in the air, but a little closer to the ground. the shuttle "atlantis" soon to go on display in florida. we'll show you the plans next. productivity up, costs down, time to market reduced... those are good things. upstairs, they will see fantasy. not fantasy... logistics. ups came in, analyzed our supply chain, inventory systems... ups? ups. not fantasy? who would have thought? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. because for every two pounds you lose through diet and exercise, alli can help you lose one more by blocking some of the fat you eat. let's fight fat with alli. ♪ >>> okay. let's get you back now to the white house. and you see that is washington, obviously. and you see the new york stock exchange. we're keeping an eye on the stock exchange. it is down now. it is down n
they are going after hagel partly because of this moment on the floor in july of 2006. this was during israel and lebanon's war and this is chuck hagel pushing the u.s. to urge a cease-fire. take a look. >> how do we realistically believe that a continuation of this system attic destruction of an american friend, the country and the people of lebanon is going to enhance america's image and give us the trust and sustainability to maintain a peace effort in the middle east? the sickening slaughter on both sides, mr. president, must end and it must end now. >> president bush must call for an immediate cease-fire. this madness must stop. the united states will remain committed to defending israel. a relationship has been in israel is a special and historic one, but it need not and cannot be at the expense of our arab and muslim relationships. that is an irresponsible and dangerous false choice. >> what's so striking about that is that that war between israel and lebanon, which the american political establishment essentially supported unanimously as it wants to do in these sort of conflicts, was
as a public service by your television provider. -- julie watches c-span on verizon. washington journal continues. host: joining us on indianapolis is doug wissing, author of "funding and the enemy." we are talking about afghanistan and the end game. first, the title of your book that you wrote this year, how u.s. taxpayers bankrolled the taliban, remind us of what you were right thing? -- were writing. guest: i am sorry. i'm getting feedback in my earphone. if you could come off my audio, thank you. when i was imbedded with u.s. soldiers in afghanistan, i began to realize that the soldiers were trying to explain to me that there was a toxics system that was connecting distracted american officials, -- i'm sorry, i'm back to getting this in my ear phone. host: we will see if they can fix it. if you can try to continue, we will try to fix it. guest: there was a toxic network, hearing myself twice simply does not work. there was a toxic network that was connecting distracted american officials, u.s. corporations, military- industrial and development and industrial complex corporations, co
victims. >> seven down! >> july 20th, just past midnight, terror inside theater nine. >> aurora, colorado, nine miles east of denver, where there has been a mass shooting at a movie theater. >> prosecutores say james holmes donned protective gear, threw tear gas and began firing. in the end, 12 people killed, 58 others wounded. holmes faces 152 charges. many victims continue to recover, while others will never recover the loss they suffered that night. and number one -- >> unimaginable horror grips the nation in one of the deadliest school shootings in u.s. history. >> tragedy at sandy hook elementary. >> this is unspeakable what happened in this town. >> innocent children shot dead in their classrooms. the victims, 16 6-year-olds, 4 7-year-olds with 6 adults. >> emilie's laughter was infectious and all those who had a pleasure to meet her would agree this world is a better place because she's been in it. >> in newtown, connecticut, an outpouring of kindness and compassion, while a nation faced hard questions about mental health and guns. as the president issued an emotional call for acti
. number eight, summer heat wave. sweltering heat baked the nation this summer. march and july set u.s. records as the hottest of all time. number seven, western wildfires. >> smoke in the air. >> the heat wave helped fuel a string of wildfires that hit the west. number six, the deratio in june. >> it began in iowa, moved through illinois, indiana, ohio and moved into washington, d.c. it took a fast moving long lasting violent thunderstorm complex. >> after charging 800 miles, 22 were dead and 5 million were without power. number five, the dallas 22. there is an old myth that tornadoes don't hit big cities. april 3rd proved otherwise when twisters hit dallas. >> scary. it was so scary. it reminds you of the wizard of oz when the tornado hit and everything just going around and around. >> 22 tornadoes caused a billion dollars worth of damage in 24 hours. number four, deadliest tornado. tornadoes took up three spots in our top ten countdown, but this event was the deadliest. march 2nd and 3rd, 70 confirmed tornadoes killed 40 people in the midwest. number three, hurricane isaac. hurric
back in 08 and was working in july, i think, he suffered cardiac arrhythmia and passed away at his desk. people watching closely remember mitt romney and jim messina tweeting condolences and the obama campaign shut down for the day when alex died. what was meaningful was it's unfathomable. he was of the age that swept obama into power. not politically silent, but somewhat motionless and actually came out in full force and helped create this identity and they were as much a part of it that they supported and it just seems profoundly unfair that he didn't make it to see at least the end of the 2012 election cycle. >> talk about the process of how newtown changed the complexion's content of the list. >> we added essentially a second cover to this issue. we use that to acknowledge the victims of newtown. to point out that this is a celebration of life. there is no way to express the horror and the that occurred in that tragedy. our decision to acknowledge newtown in a context that we gave it was simply the only meaning we can scribe to at this moment. we have meaning for decades and decades
depot's annual revenue comes for the quarter that ends in july, about the same for lowe's as well. those are two stocks to watch in today's decision. but the nrf guy also made a point of saying that containers are coming in, and there could be a backup that needs to be resolved. even if the situation is resolved in a matter of days, there are still going to be containers that are stacked and they've got to work through that backlog before they can take in new containers. so there will be a ripple effect. >>> let's bring in peter anderson, senior portfolio manager with congress manage asset. good to see you. >> thank you. >> at this point, what is the risk to the markets? risk to the upside or the downside if a deal is reached? >> well, i first have to tell you that strategically, i'm not really factoring that the whole fiscal cliff picture into a longer term portfolio strategy. i think it's very, very difficult to do that however, like everybody else, we are glued to the headlines to see how this thing is going to play out. butting that being said, i think the main important reason is th
of july break. my staff said i am crazy. it was feasible if you went about the work seriously. by the fourth of the library, guess what? all of the bills had been passed. we were able to send everyone of those bills to the president's desk. they were signed in the law with bipartisan support. that sort of work can make a difference. more voices need to be heard in support of that effort. >> my recollection would be since then, it has been budgeting by continuing resolutions. >> we have done an awful lot. a lot of people do not realize we have demonstrated we can do this regular order. the more we move the committee back rather than having everything dominated in a speaker's office, the better off the congress will be. >> who loses and who gains when -- >> who loses and who gains when -- >> the existing agencies have their pipelines already clogged with money and we throw more money at it without any serious oversight. continuing resolutions are ignoring our responsibility and our goal is that we have got a job to do. to see how money is cspent, and to control how it should be
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)